Geotagging My Images

One of the benefits of digital photography over film is the ability to tag the location of where the image was taken into the file.  I’ve been geotagging my images now for several years, especially since my iPhone tags the images automatically.

Up until recently, I’ve had to add the geolocation information into my images after the fact.  My 7D Mark II has GPS built-in, as well as my iPhone.  For any images captured with any other camera, as well as scanned images, I’ve had to add the location later on.

There are three different ways I’ve used to gather the location information and then embed the info to the image file.

  • Use iPhone app to save to GPX file
    • I’ve used an app called GPX Master, which has not been updated in several years, to create a log of where I’ve been at a particular moment.  As long as the time on my camera matches the time on my iPhone, when I load the tracklog into Lightroom, the proper images will get tagged with the correct location.
  • Use iPhone to take an image from the same location and then copy the coordinates to images
    • If I don’t want to turn on the GPS in my 7D Mark II nor use my iPhone to log my location (perhaps due to low battery), I can take photos using my iPhone and then copy the coordinates to the images from the 7DII inside Lightroom.
  • Manually add the coordinates
    • For all of my old images, including old film prints which I scanned into my computer to preserve, I’ve had to manually add the coordinates.  Before I used Lightroom, I would add the GPS information using Google Earth.  It’s similar to the map module inside of Lightroom.  One downside is trying to remember where I was years before.  Another downside is that I may not remember where I was standing but know what I was taking a picture of, so I would geotag the location of the subject, not where I was located.  This makes it hard for me to return to the same spot in the future.

Another option, which I’ve never used, is an external GPS receiver.  These are separate devices which attach to the camera, either with a wire or wirelessly, and embed the GPS information into the image as you’re shooting.  They typically run about $250 so I chose to go with the cheap/free method instead.